Customer Support

Minnesota Electric Rate Proposal

At Xcel Energy, we work every day to provide the reliable energy that our customers depend on, delivering increasingly clean energy at an affordable price, while supporting our customers and the communities we serve. Our three-year rate proposal to the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission includes investments to deliver a better product for our customers, giving them more of what they expect from us. That means we’re investing in strengthening the energy grid, enhancing the reliability of the service our customers count on, while expanding clean energy and keeping bills low in the years ahead. These projects are key to meeting our customers’ needs today and in the future, as we build toward our vision of providing 100% carbon-free electricity to customers by 2050.

We can accomplish this while keeping bills low for customers. In 2020, residential electric bills were 22% below the national average and 15% below the Minnesota average. This proposal is our first rate application to move forward in six years, and under this proposal, residential customers’ bills would remain below the national average. Interim rates, which the company implements while the Commission considers our full proposal, began Jan. 1, 2022.  Find out more about interim rates (PDF)

Find out more about our electric rate proposal (PDF).

We are committed to helping customers who may be struggling with their bills. If you’re having trouble keeping up with your bill, we’re here to help (external link).

Contact us (external link) and we will work with you to set up a payment plan and connect you with other resources that can help.

Rate Application Filing Documents

Vol. 2A, 1 of 7 Chamberlain – Policy and Multi-Year Rate Plan (PDF)
Vol. 2A, 2 of 7 Halama – Revenue Requirements ¬– Public (PDF)
Vol. 2A, 3 of 7 Johnson – Capital Structure – Part 1 of 2 (PDF)
Vol. 2A, 3 of 7 Johnson – Capital Structure – Part 2 of 2 (PDF)
Vol. 2A, 4 of 7 D’Ascendis – Return on Equity (PDF)
Vol. 2A, 5 of 7 Lyons – MYRP Return on Equity (PDF)
Vol. 2A, 6 of 7 Ostrom – Budgeting – Part 1 of 2 (PDF)
Vol. 2A, 6 of 7 Ostrom – Budgeting – Part 2 of 2 (PDF)
Vol. 2A, 7 of 7 Goodenough – Sales Forecast – Public (PDF)
Vol. 2B, 1 of 5 Gardner – Nuclear Public (PDF)
Vol. 2B, 2 of 5 Benson – Transmission (PDF)
Vol. 2B, 3 of 5 Capra – Energy Supply – Public (PDF)
Vol. 2B, 4 of 5 Bloch – Distribution – Public (PDF)
Vol. 2B, 5 of 5 Remington – Business Systems (PDF)
Vol. 2C, 1 of 6 Cardenas – Customer Care/Bad Debt (PDF)
Vol. 2C, 2 of 6 Baumgarten – Cost Allocations
Vol. 2C, 3 of 6 Arend – Property Tax (PDF)
Vol. 2C, 4 of 6 Miller – Insurance Public (PDF)
Vol. 2C, 5 of 6 Husen – Employee Expenses – Public (PDF)
Vol. 2C, 6 of 6 Moeller – Depreciation – Public (PDF)
Vol. 2D, 1 of 5 Schrubbe – Pension (PDF)
Vol. 2D, 2 of 5 Inglis – Pension Investments (PDF)
Vol. 2D, 3 of 5 Lowenthal – Comp and Benefits – Public (PDF)
Vol. 2D, 4 of 5 Peppin – Class Cost of Service Study – Public (PDF)
Vol. 2D, 5 of 5 Paluck – Rate Design / Decoupling (PDF)
Vol. 2E, 1 of 1 Proposed Tariffs – List, Summary of Changes, Redlined & Clean (PDF)

 

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Energy Saving Tip

Set your hot water heater to no higher than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This isn't just energy smart—it's also safer, since it reduces the likelihood of accidental burns.

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Break Ground, Not the Law

Always call 811 before digging in your yard to avoid hitting buried gas or electric lines. Not only is it the safe thing to do, but it's the law.